Awaiting the start of John Ashbery and Mark Ford @92y. Excited!!!

Awaiting the start of John Ashbery and Mark Ford @92y. Excited!!!

My first trip home to #Brooklyn after a #NBCC awards in 8 years. #taxi #happy

My first trip home to #Brooklyn after a #NBCC awards in 8 years. #taxi #happy

The @parisreview always shows up in the most unlikely places @Foliocue #launch w/ @seansime

The @parisreview always shows up in the most unlikely places @Foliocue #launch w/ @seansime

SRPR Job Opening: Spring/Summer Intern

Friends, neighbors, colleagues, I’m working really hard to expand here at SRPR and I’m starting with an intern who will hopefully turn into a full time assistant or associate publicist this summer. Intern job description below but if you know anyone at the assistant level feel free to send them my way too.

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Sarah Russo Public Relations is a literary public relations and media strategy firm excelling in traditional PR, social campaigns and publishing strategy and partnerships.

We are looking for an intern for spring/summer to help with all aspects of running this small business, from writing drafts of press materials and designing galleys to running errands and assisting at parties. The perfect person will be able to devote ten or more hours per week, have great communication skills, be an active reader interested in fiction and nonfiction, and be engaged with the news and on social networks.

There will be opportunities to network, attend events, communicate with clients, sit in on meetings and work on drawing up business proposals. There are many opportunities to learn all about publicity and marketing and also how to run a small business. We will train you in how to use our PA2K database, do research on the Cision database, create lists and maintain them, and do outreach to the media effectively. 

Students are welcome to apply and we can work with your schedule and with your school for credit. A travel stipend is provided for interns who can devote 15 or more hours per week. Opportunities to grow into a paid position are available for qualified candidates. Please send a resume and writing sample to: sarah (at) sarahrusso (dot) com.

John Reed’s notes on the window for his class last night where we talked about PR, publishing and what I do.

John Reed’s notes on the window for his class last night where we talked about PR, publishing and what I do.

Open letter to United Airlines

Now this is how a communications crisis begins.

katetravers:

Jeff Smisek, President and Chief Executive Officer, United Continental Holdings, Inc.
Scott O’Leary, Managing Director – Customer Care & Refunds
Anne Seeley, Managing director, customer solutions

Dear Jeff Smisek, Scott O’Leary, and Anne Seeley:
My husband, Phillip Sexton and I are…
My husband is an amazing photographer and person. 
seansime:

AUTISM SPEAKS. 

Not too many things stop me in my tracks these days. Whether it’s simply a function of my age (no comment) or living in New York City, where the unbelievable becomes the everyday I’m not sure, but a recent job changed that.
 I was sent to photograph a family in the Bronx for a story about people with developmental disabilities. I’ve always enjoyed working with non-profits, especially those working in under-served communities. So I was looking forward to meeting the family and especially their son Kurt.
 He is an adult with autism, largely non-verbal, but still able to communicate through signing and gestures. I had spoken at length with his father about what to expect and since Kurt was regimented in his routine we had to be prepared to only have a few minutes of photography time if he didn’t accept me.
 We all arrived at the same time and rode the elevator up together. Kurt would glance in my direction, but for the most part ignored me. Inside the apartment he went right into his routine. First, donned the headphones (5 tracks of early Madonna on repeat), then waited for the first of many waffles to arrive at the dining room table. Kurt rarely sits. He paces, occasionally adjusting his headphones and often walks up to his parents and begins clapping until they join him. His father explained to me he does this when he is happy and wants people to clap with him. I should mention he is also very particular about the clap; right hand on top and at a slight angle. His father told me to watch as he switched his top hand. Kurt came over and held his father’s hands in the “correct” position and urged him to clap again, nodding when it was done properly.
Before I knew it almost an hour had gone by. I was surprised to notice Kurt looking at me. He walked over, gently took my hands off my camera and started clapping. I clapped too, and he was quick with some needed correction in my technique. He smiled and nodded in approval once I got it right. His father said, “You’re part of the club now.” It felt wonderful. 
I rode the train home thinking about the slogan “Autism Speaks”. Slowly a smile came to my face as I realized yes, it does, even when an autistic person can’t.
Photo: Kurt and his father share a quiet moment.

My husband is an amazing photographer and person. 

seansime:

AUTISM SPEAKS. 

Not too many things stop me in my tracks these days. Whether it’s simply a function of my age (no comment) or living in New York City, where the unbelievable becomes the everyday I’m not sure, but a recent job changed that.

 I was sent to photograph a family in the Bronx for a story about people with developmental disabilities. I’ve always enjoyed working with non-profits, especially those working in under-served communities. So I was looking forward to meeting the family and especially their son Kurt.

 He is an adult with autism, largely non-verbal, but still able to communicate through signing and gestures. I had spoken at length with his father about what to expect and since Kurt was regimented in his routine we had to be prepared to only have a few minutes of photography time if he didn’t accept me.

 We all arrived at the same time and rode the elevator up together. Kurt would glance in my direction, but for the most part ignored me. Inside the apartment he went right into his routine. First, donned the headphones (5 tracks of early Madonna on repeat), then waited for the first of many waffles to arrive at the dining room table. Kurt rarely sits. He paces, occasionally adjusting his headphones and often walks up to his parents and begins clapping until they join him. His father explained to me he does this when he is happy and wants people to clap with him. I should mention he is also very particular about the clap; right hand on top and at a slight angle. His father told me to watch as he switched his top hand. Kurt came over and held his father’s hands in the “correct” position and urged him to clap again, nodding when it was done properly.

Before I knew it almost an hour had gone by. I was surprised to notice Kurt looking at me. He walked over, gently took my hands off my camera and started clapping. I clapped too, and he was quick with some needed correction in my technique. He smiled and nodded in approval once I got it right. His father said, “You’re part of the club now.” It felt wonderful. 

I rode the train home thinking about the slogan “Autism Speaks”. Slowly a smile came to my face as I realized yes, it does, even when an autistic person can’t.

Photo: Kurt and his father share a quiet moment.

Molly Crabapple and @luxlotus talking at India House about giving a voice to those who cannot speak for themselves

Molly Crabapple and @luxlotus talking at India House about giving a voice to those who cannot speak for themselves

52,000 

52,000. That is the number of submissions made to the New York Times "Modern Love" column since it launched in 2004. 

Want to know how many have been published?

Under 500!

(as read in the Feb 2014 issue of Real Simple)

This morning’s sunrise run. Suffice it to say, it doesn’t look like that on the lake right now!

This morning’s sunrise run. Suffice it to say, it doesn’t look like that on the lake right now!